OMG that dress!

A blog for fashion and history.

Follow me blog with Bloglovin

Punu Mask
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
"When works from Equatorial Africa in this refined style began to enter  Western consciousness in the early twentieth century, they were a great enigma  to art critics. Many speculated about the sources of their exotic aesthetic and  even proposed possible Asian influence, though the art form was in fact  indigenous to southern Gabon. Such masks were worn by virtuosic male performers  of a stilt dance called "mukudj," which involved towering impressively while  executing complex choreography and astonishing feats of acrobatics.
The  creator of a “mukudj” mask would attempt to capture the likeness of the most  beautiful woman in his community. The subject of this particular idealized and  stylized portrait was embellished in classic nineteenth-century fashion with a  coiffure composed of a central lobe and two lateral tresses and with  cicatrization motifs on the forehead and temples. Kaolin taken from riverbeds,  which was associated with healing and with a spiritual, ancestral realm of  existence, was applied to the surface of the face. By using this material, the  artist both celebrated the beauty of a mortal woman and transformed her into a  transcendent being.” View high resolution

Punu Mask

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

"When works from Equatorial Africa in this refined style began to enter Western consciousness in the early twentieth century, they were a great enigma to art critics. Many speculated about the sources of their exotic aesthetic and even proposed possible Asian influence, though the art form was in fact indigenous to southern Gabon. Such masks were worn by virtuosic male performers of a stilt dance called "mukudj," which involved towering impressively while executing complex choreography and astonishing feats of acrobatics.


The creator of a “mukudj” mask would attempt to capture the likeness of the most beautiful woman in his community. The subject of this particular idealized and stylized portrait was embellished in classic nineteenth-century fashion with a coiffure composed of a central lobe and two lateral tresses and with cicatrization motifs on the forehead and temples. Kaolin taken from riverbeds, which was associated with healing and with a spiritual, ancestral realm of existence, was applied to the surface of the face. By using this material, the artist both celebrated the beauty of a mortal woman and transformed her into a transcendent being.”

  1. toiletman reblogged this from n9nlinear
  2. n9nlinear reblogged this from iamnot-thereforeithink
  3. iamnot-thereforeithink reblogged this from omgthatdress
  4. undersally reblogged this from omgthatdress
  5. look-something-shiny reblogged this from omgthatdress
  6. ausetkmt reblogged this from omgthatdress
  7. notwiselybuttoowell reblogged this from omgthatdress
  8. wynndeofol reblogged this from omgthatdress
  9. nawhippahipsquee reblogged this from omgthatdress
  10. blackbirdblade reblogged this from omgthatdress
  11. omgthatdress posted this

Ultralite Powered by Tumblr | Designed by:Doinwork